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Suscribe to an electricity provider in your new home

Suscribe to an electricity provider in your new home

If you just moved in your apartment and you find the electricity shut down, you should know that you will have to contact an  electricity provider and sign a new contract.

It is important that you do it as soon as possible, since subscribing to an electricity provider usually takes between 5 and 9 business days, so it is important that you do it as soon as possible if you want to have electricity in your home, whether it is for light or gas.

How to subscribe to an energy provider in your new home?

For everything to go correctly, you must contact the provider assigned to you according to your zone and request for a new contract. In this first step, you’ll have to give the contracted provider all the information they need as well as the contracted power.

The contracted power you will need is very important, since if you subscribe to a one that does not fit your needs you will have future problems, such as the common power failure.

To know what contracted power you will need for your home, we advise you to use a gas and light comparator that will help you know which light company to hire and which is the best electric company in the market Knowing the best electric company to subscribe to is important, as it will facilitate the management of supplies and save energy.

Another important aspect is the requirements needed to register to that new provider. To register the light with Endesa, Iberdrola or another company, you will need to provide a series of documents, as well as know the subscription price. For example, the documents you will need to subscribe are the following:

  • Name, surname and national identity document, whether National Document of Identity, or passport.
  • Exact postal address of the home where the subscription will apply.
  • CUPS Code (JE SAIS PAS CE QUE CEST) that will be provided by the company itself if it is the first time you request that provider.
  • Certificate or the Electrical Bulletin that states that the electrical installation is in good condition…
  • The current account number (IBAN) for the payments.

Once you provide the documents, most companies spend between 5 and 9 days to craft the contract. When registering, the user must pay fees divided into rights of access, engagement and extension, and are usually linked to the provider of electricity chosen.

To do this, we advise you to contact the company in question and ask the conditions of signing a new contract.

Create a sustainable and efficient home

To create a sustainable home, it is not only necessary to take into account electrical supplies, you should also consider consumption habits. The routines that are followed at home and the type of installation will be key to creating an efficient house.

Some aspects, such as good thermal insulation, the installation of LED bulbs or appliances with an A +++ efficiency label will be the key to energy savings. If you want more advice, Fotocasa gives them to you in your last article.

Things to consider when buying a property in Spain

Things to consider when buying a property in Spain

Buying a property is the biggest investment most people will make in their lives. Buying one abroad is an even bigger undertaking as it involves navigating a foreign legal and financial terrain. It is normal to feel daunted by the task, but like anything in life, the better prepared you are going into it, the more likely you are to make a success of it. That being the case, Sonneil has compiled a list of important things to consider when buying a house in Spain.

Location, location, location

A house gains in value if it is located in an area with high quality schools and with good communication and transportation routes to the main urban centers, so be sure to ask about these local amenities. It’s a good idea to ask about future development plans pending approval as these may affect the house or its surroundings, and find out as much as you can about how much other properties in the area have sold for recently.

Viewing the property

When visiting the your prospective property purchase take note of things like the orientation of the house, ventilation of the bathrooms and kitchen, the state of the electrical installation, the arrangement of partitions and doors and the ambient noise levels outside. Take photos and write down your observations in a notebook to better remember the property after you leave. Ask the seller about the building’s energy efficiency rating. Choosing a home with an A rating in terms of its energy efficiency means an estimated saving of 89% compared to an F rating, thus allowing you to save money while you save the planet.

The purchasing process

The deposit agreement

Once you’ve chosen your new home and are ready to start the process of buying it, then the legal and financial considerations come to the fore. This starts with the signing of the deposit agreement. The deposit is usually around 10% of the cost of the house. Once the agreement is signed you take on the rights and responsibilities of a buyer. If you later decide not to go through with the transaction, you will lose this deposit but if the seller cancels the sale, they will have to return the deposit to you.

The title deed

Next is the signing of the title deed. This part of the buying process must be done in front of a notary with both the buyer and seller present. The deed must contain a description of the property as well as explaining any mortgages or charges on the house, the final sale price agreed and how it will be paid, plus the taxes and expenses related to the sale.

Taxes and other charges

The main taxes to be paid are the property transfer tax (“Impuesto de Transmisiones Patrimoniales” or ITP) and VAT. Other expenses include notary costs, the payment to add your name to the property register and any costs related to the mortgage.

In the end, the total taxes, charges and expenses represent around 8% to 13% of the purchase price, depending on the autonomous community (Spanish region) in which you are buying.

If you have reached this far in the process, then congratulations, you are the proud owner of your own Spanish property!  

Moving to spain with kids

Moving to spain with kids

Making the move to Spain is a dream come true for many people. However, it comes with its logistical challenges. This is especially true for families, for whom the extra consideration of schooling and activities for their children must be taken into account. This being the case, Sonneil has composed the following guide to help navigate the tricky terrain of settling down in Spain with a family.

Once you’ve made the move to Spain with kids, it’s important to try integrate into the community as quickly as possible. As anybody who has ever moved to another city – or even just another neighbourhood – will know, the process of integration that follows is usually driven less by the parents and more by the children.

Starting a new school, with all the socialisation and extra-curricular activities that go with it, is the most guaranteed way of integrating the entire family into the new environs.

The exact same applies for families making the move further afield. And while a move to Spain might be more daunting overall than moving within the UK, parents will be relieved to know that despite some differences in culture and, of course, language, the Spanish education system is broadly similar to that of the UK.

Spanish education system

Early Childhood Education

Pre-school in Spain is divided broadly into two stages, based on the child’s age: nursery schools (guarderias) cater for children from around three months up to three years old, while kindergarten or infant schools (escuela infantil) are for children from three until six. The first cycle of pre-school is not provided for by the state, hence parents have to pay out of their own pocket.

This will cost in the region of 300 euros a month.

The good news is that after that the option exists to avail of Spanish state public schooling which is free for the rest of your child’s school-going years, although private school options are also available. Though pre-school is not compulsory, it’s common: The OECD reports that Spain has nearly full enrolment in early childhood education, with 95% of 3-year-olds and 97% for 4-year-olds enrolled.

It is worth noting that the availability of pre-school in Spain is not always widespread; it depends on the area, particularly for state schools, as well as the demand. Often it can be quite difficult to find a place for your child.

Day-care centres

Placing your infant in a nursery not only ensures a safe environ for them if you need to go out to work, it will also provide a deep immersion in Spanish culture and language from the earliest age.

It is not uncommon to see babies as young as four months at guarderias. Because of the country’s sizeable expat community, there are English language nursery schools in Spain in some areas, particularly in the major cities or the Costas and Islands.

Nurseries generally offer low-cost childcare, rather than formal education.

There are also private, fee-based nurseries and these generally cater for children aged two to six. Sometimes these are attached to primary schools, in which case children can just transition into their formal education.

There is a reasonable amount of flexibility in terms of hours of attendance and parents can choose mornings, afternoons, full days or just a few days per week. Schools sometimes also provide transport between home and schools.

The first step is to evaluate the type of nursery to choose. There are public and private nurseries. However, choice is often limited by availability, meaning that if all the local state-funded day care centres are full, there will be no option but to go private.

In the case of public nurseries, the prices that have to be paid depend on the parents’ financial circumstances, meaning many families pay considerably less that the 300 euros-a-month maximum rate.

Pre-school

Unlike with nurseries, pre-school, which begins at age three, is provided free of charge by the state. During this cycle, children are introduced to the subjects that they go on to study in primary school. As such, pre-school teachers must hold a master’s degree with a specialisation in Early Childhood Education or an equivalent degree.

In terms of educational outcome, no rigid targets are set in pre-school with the focus generally being on project-based learning.

Most pre-schools offer an adaptation period at the start of term and it is not uncommon for school to last only 30 minutes on the first day. It then slowly builds up to the full day which, in most, but not all regions, is from 9am until 2pm. Be sure to check the timetables of the schools where you are considering moving to.

Both nurseries and pre-schools in Spain must comply with a series of hygiene, health, safety and accessibility conditions that are required in order to obtain an operating licence. In the case of pre-schools, their facilities must meet a series of requirements including an independent entrance from outside, an area of ​​two square meters for each student per class, an accessible toilet, an exclusive playground with a minimum area of between 60 and 75 square meters, and adequate space for the preparation of food and toilets for the staff separated from those of the students.

Pre-school is highly recommended, particularly if your children are going to continue with a state education. After one or two years they will be integrated into the local community and will have learnt Spanish in preparation for primary school.

Primary school

Primary education in Spain is compulsory and free. In general, the students will join the first year of primary education at age six and leave at age 12.

You can get a list of the state schools in your Spanish town from the Town Hall or Local Education Centre.

You can register your child with a state school once you and your family are registered as residents at the local town hall. The local authorities will require the following documents:

  • Proof of residence (rental contract or property deeds)
  • Passport or residence card
  • Child’s birth certificate
  • Proof of the child’s vaccinations and a medical certificate of health (in some areas)

Although the performance of schools in Spain is not publicised, each area has a central office where you can ask which schools in your area are performing the best.

Try to organise your move to Spain before the next school year begins, so they can begin at the start of the semester. In fact, most schools in Spain confirm students’ attendance for the following school year by March.

If you are moving to Spain after your children have started junior school they might need additional Spanish lessons and, depending on their age, may be put into a class with children a year younger, to enable them to catch up.

Primary schools in Spain teach the Spanish language (Castilian) maths; science and social science as well as foreign languages, arts education and physical education. In autonomous regions with their own languages – like Catalonia/Valencia (Catalan) or the Basque region (Basque) classes will also be taught in those languages.

In these areas students must study the Co-official Language and Literature, however, depending on the age at which your child begins their schooling in Spain, they may be able to seek an exemption from sitting tests in the local language.

As for the schedules, these can vary from school to school. However, usually they start around 8:30/9 am and end around 5 pm, with a two-hour break between 1:00 pm and 3:00 pm.

Secondary school

Educación Secundaria Obligatoria (ESO) is free and compulsory education that consists of four academic courses usually taught between the ages of 12 and 16 years old. As is the case in the UK, children then have the option to leave school entirely.

Those who choose to remain on in education now enter the Baccalaureate stage that goes from 16 to 18 years old and prepares young people to access university or vocational training at a higher level.

It is taught in the same institutes as the ESO and consists of three different modalities (sciences, arts and humanities and social sciences) that are chosen according to what the student wants to study in the future.

There are three types of secondary school in Spain: public, private and Concertado schools.

Public Schools

As is the case with primary schools, state-funded secondary schools are financed and managed by the government with the help of local administrations in each area. Most of these centres teach all levels of education – pre-school, primary, and secondary – although some centres delegate the higher cycles in public institutes.

They have limited places and in order to access them you have to meet a series of requirements established by the Central Administration (proximity to housing etc). Therefore, parents can submit an application to the school of their choice, but acceptance will depend on whether their circumstances meet the established criteria.

Concertado Schools

These are private schools that are subsidised to a great extent by the Central Administration. They have freedom of management but must meet certain conditions established by the government such as a limit on the number of students per class, dates, admissions, etc.

You can expect to pay in the region of 100 – 200 euros a month for a place in a concertado school and the common perception is that the education received in them is better than in public schools.

Private Schools

As in the case with private primary schools, these are financed exclusively by the parents of the students. They have complete freedom of management and some freedom of curriculum. In private schools, you have the option of either Spanish speaking schools or bilingual schools which have an emphasis on English.

Prices for private schools differ between schools, but you should find the fees lower than those of British private schools.

International schools

In Spain International schools generally have smaller class sizes and will work to the English curriculum, helping your child settle back into their studies. Students also learn Spanish as a foreign language. You may find an international school more appropriate for your older children.

As international schools are usually based in large towns, you may need to consider the costs and convenience of travel to and from the school.

Family Time

If you have moved from the UK to work for a Spanish company, one of the most notable differences will be the high number of paid bank holidays there are compared to back home.

Indeed, while UK companies generally offer 28 days paid leave – six more than in Spain, when you include bank holidays the total number of paid vacation days in Spain jumps to 36 – which is eight more than the UK.

This is due to the plethora of religious, regional and national observances in Spain. The national holidays are New Year (January 1), Fest of the Epiphany (Jan 6) Good Friday (March or April) May Day (May 1), Feast of the Assumption (August 15), Spanish National Day (October 12), All Saints (November 1), Constitution Day (December 6) and Feast of the Immaculate Conception (December 8) Christmas (December 25).

On top of these you can expect another four days off thanks to regional holidays, depending on where you live. On occasions when a public holiday falls on either a Tuesday or Thursday, the common practice in Spain is take the Monday or Friday off, thereby creating a four-day weekend.

All of this means more time for families to spend together, providing a wonderful opportunity to explore the local area or region.

Which are the most important formalities you need to take care of when moving to a new house in Spain?

Which are the most important formalities you need to take care of when moving to a new house in Spain?

Some people find moving to a new house an incredibly stressful experience. Not only do you have to sort out all your personal belongings and pack up your life in boxes, but there’s a ton of red tape and paperwork to do, such as changing bills into your name, setting up direct debits and arranging electricity supply agreements.

What’s the best way to organise a move?

First of all, schedule a date and time for the move. You will need to do this before you can arrange things with the removal company. It’s also a good idea to avoid rush hour if you are carrying heavy loads.

Hire a removal company that not only offers good services, but also guarantees you will receive your precious objects undamaged. What’s more, the company should advise you about transport and how to package each object according to its fragility and size.

Once everything is packed up, you have to decide whether to take it to your new home, put it in storage, or just donate it, as Merca2 also suggests in its article. It is important to know the order in which objects should be packed, in other words, the things you use most frequently should be the last you pack, so that the move causes as little interference as possible with your daily life.

Lastly, before you move, you should start sorting out the red tape. Start by setting up direct debits for your bills and find out about the tariff you want to sign up for in your new home to avoid any unwanted surprises.

What about electricity, gas and water supplies? 

You should preferably organise utilities and set up direct debits before you move into your new home. This type of arrangement usually takes between 15 and 20 business days to take effect. That’s why it’s important to find out whether or not there is a supply at the property and, if you are moving into a rental property, change the bills into your own name.

If you need to put the bills into your name, you will be asked for a number of documents, particularly the identity document of the current supply holder and that of the new occupant.

If there is no existing service at the property, you will need to contact the distributor and complete additional formalities as well as several documents. It is important to find out which distributor is responsible for the electricity service in your area.

You will need the following documents to sign up for an electricity supply:

  • Current, valid passport or national identity document.
  • CUPS [Universal Supply Point Code] number. If you do not have this, it must be requested from the company.
  • Your postal code.
  • Bank account for paying the bills.
  • Electricity bulletin. 

A safe move

Security during a move is essential to your peace of mind. That’s why it’s important to take out the insurance offered by the company to cover any loss or damage to your belongings.

Some of this advice also appears in this article in Diario Digital de Asturias.

5 reasons to attend to a property exhibition

5 reasons to attend to a property exhibition

If you are thinking of buying a home in Spain, you’ve probably started to do some research on the Internet. You will have seen websites, real estate agency pages and even big real estate portals like Idealista, Fotocasa and Rightmove Overseas. So, why bother going to a property exhibition?

Here are five good reasons why going to a property exhibition will help you to find the home you are looking for, even though you might enjoy searching online.

(more…)

Expat life: Making new friends

Expat life: Making new friends

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

 

 

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

 

 

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

 

 

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

 

 

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

 

 

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

 

 

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

 

 

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

 

 

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

 

 

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

 

 

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

 

 

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

 

 

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

 

 

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

 

 

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

 

 

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

 

 

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

 

 

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

 

 

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

 

 

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

 

 

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

 

 

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

 

 

Moving to a new country is fraught with challenges – finding a new job, getting to grips with the local way of life, new culture, new food etc. But there is another challenge and one that is often overlooked amidst all the other pressures of the move: making new friends. This can be especially difficult for adults who don´t have the advantage of going to school every day and being forced to make friends that way, as is the case with children. Thankfully, there are loads of ways of smoothing this part of the transition and ensuring that finding your place in the sun needn´t mean abandoning your social life.

Expat Forums

When you first arrive in a new country it can be very comforting to seek out your fellow nationals who have been living there longer: they know the ropes and the pitfalls and can point you in the right direction until you find your feet. In Spain there are numerous forums where you can ask questions of other expats about things like the school system, health care, housing etc. Often, regular contributors to these forums will suggest meeting up to get to know each other person, this offers a good opportunity to establish the all-important network of fellow expats to help orientate you in your new surroundings.

Meetup

Meetup is an international organisation that brings people together around shared interests – whatever they may be. Meetups are great because they are really informal and no matter what your preferred pastime, no matter how mundane or out of the ordinary, you are sure to find likeminded enthusiasts to share it with. They tend to attract people from a broad cross section of international society meaning you get to mingle with all sorts of people while broadening your cultural horizons.

Language exchange

If you want to break out of the expat bubble and work on your Spanish skills at the same time then signing up for a language exchange is the way to go. These can be organised in groups through sites like Meetup or you can opt for one on one exchanges. The beauty of this is that you kill two birds with one stone; on the one hand you pick up the language and on the other it presents the opportunity of making friends with a local.

Join your building/local association

So you have made a host of friends from around the world with Meetup and gotten to know a few locals through language exchange and you´re ready to take the integration process to the next level. There´s no better way to do this than by joining the residents association in your district or apartment building. Regular meetings are held to discuss the local issues and going along to a few would be a great way to get to know your neighbours and let them know that you are no blow in – you´re here to stay and you want to contribute to the well-being of the community.

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